2.26.2015

Rhoda Gollehur Ryan

Rhoda Gollehur Ryan

There doesn't seem to be an obituary - when you die alone, people don't bother.
Rhoda was worth bothering for.

Rhoda was a friend and a talented weaver.
She was a founding member of the Eugene Weavers Guild - see history

She invited me to join the Central Oregon Spinners and Weavers Guild
My first Guild meeting and my first trip to Crooked River Ranch was as a passenger in Rhoda's car - a trip that scared me half to death - she was well into her 80s and a speeder!
She reached out to me and invited me into the Guild and included me.
She was a lady.

She was born June 3, 1911
She died  March 10, 2011
She was married to Charles "Bryan" Ryan on January 1, 1942

She will live in my memory as a warm, friendly, talented woman.

She was childless and married to the love of her life.
Her home was the magic of art - her husband a fine artist - she a weaver.
Through the magic of a green thumb, the Ryan's always had magnificent homegrown and ripe tomatoes in Central Oregon!

I am richer for having known her.

Charles Bryan Ryan

Charles Bryan Ryan
Nov. 14, 1909 — Nov. 27, 2001
Charles Bryan Ryan of Tumalo died Tuesday of natural causes. He was 92.
No service will be held.
Mr. Ryan was born Nov. 14, 1909, in Fort Jones, Calif., to Charles and Emma (Barr) Ryan. He attended the University of Oregon. He married Rhonda Gollehur on Jan. 1, 1942.
He served in the Army in the 10th Mountain Division. He taught at the Army University in Florence, Italy. He was honorably discharged on May 8, 1946, as a First Lieutenant.
Mr. Ryan worked as a professor of art at the University of Oregon.
He retired in 1976.
Survivors include his wife of Tumalo; and a nephew, Jeffrey Mills of Tualatin.
Memorial contributions may be made to Central Oregon Hospice, 2698 NE Courtney Drive, Bend 97701.
Niswonger, Reynolds and Tabor Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.
-----------------------------------
Correction - His wife's name was Rhoda Gollehur Ryan

-----------------------------------

The works of alifetime

The art of Tumalo's Charles Bryan Ryan has gained recognition he never sought
Andrew Moore /
After retiring from his art professorship at the University of Oregon in 1976, Charles Bryan Ryan moved to Tumalo, never to paint again.
Having spent 30 years introducing theory and technique to U of O art students, Ryan was ready to indulge his other passion: the outdoors. He joined the Over the Hill Gang, a local senior ski club, and until his death in 2001 at age 92, Ryan hiked, camped and reveled in the area's natural beauty, according to family friend Sandra Miller.
In 2003, Rhoda Ryan called Miller, owner of Frame Design and Sunbird Gallery in Bend, and asked what she should do with her late husband's artwork. She had sold the family home and was preparing an estate sale in advance of her move to an assisted-living facility.
Miller obliged her friend, and found Ryan's paintings stacked unceremoniously in the couple's garage, left by the late artist to gather dust. Upon reviewing the art, Miller was awestruck.
”All (the paintings) were dusty and dirty, but all these wonderful colors came out,” Miller said. ”My first feeling was 'Oh my God, this is a group of paintings we really need to show people.'”
And so with Rhoda Ryan's permission, Miller began cataloging Ryan's work. What she discovered was a comprehensive collection of modern art that ranged from geometric abstractions to Cezanne-inspired landscapes, amassed from Ryan's long teaching career. Many of the paintings are thickly painted, in the impasto style, rendered with complementary colors to add tonal effects, Miller said.
”You can't just put paint on if you don't know what you are doing. I mean you can, but it won't turn out like this,” said Miller of the exhibit.
After a year was spent cleaning, cataloging and framing the art, often using frames built by Ryan and left in a similar dusty stack, Miller hung the work in The Gallery in the Pinckney Center for the Arts at Central Oregon Community College in October of 2003.
From there, the exhibit traveled to the Coos Art Museum in Coos Bay. M.J. Koreiva, the executive director of the museum, described Ryan as an influential contemporary artist.
”His work is very reflective of mid-1950s and mid-'60s art work,” Koreiva said. ”Contemporary works of the '50s are now looked back upon as holding the test of time.”
The exhibit is now back in Central Oregon, hanging at the Bend Public Library through July (see ”If You Go”). It includes mostly oil paintings, but also pastels, drawings, prints, lithographs and sketches.
”He was definitely a product of the age,” Miller said. ”I also think that he was ahead of his time insofar as he was teaching the art aesthetic of cubism, and elements that came from the later part of the 1800s and early 1900s.”
Ryan was born in 1909 in Fort Jones, Calif., a small Northern California town in the shadow of Mount Shasta. At the U of O, he earned a bachelor's degree in fine arts in 1939, and a master's in fine arts the following year. He was then hired as a teaching assistant in the university's zoology department, according to the exhibit's biography of Ryan, before World War II intervened.
As an avid outdoorsman, Ryan was recruited to join the Army's famed 10th Mountain Division, the ”ski troops.” Among those he served with was Mount Bachelor founder Bill Healy.
When the division was ordered to the Italian front, Lt. Ryan took advantage of his relocation to study art, leading fellow soldiers on tours of the region's art and architectural highlights. Immediately after the war, Ryan stayed overseas to teach art at the University of Florence in Italy.
He returned to Oregon in 1946, taking up an art instructor position with the U of O, and stayed with the university until his retirement.
Through the U of O, Ryan developed a friendship with Buckminster Fuller, the renowned 20th-century architect, scientist and philosopher. It was a relationship that deeply affected both Ryan's work and his life. In the exhibit at the library is a letter from Ryan to Fuller, addressed to ”Bucky.”
”Ryan was a good friend of Fuller's,” Miller said. ”He took on a lot of his ideas and theories, such as how strength is created by certain geometric formations, and (Ryan) built examples of these principles as teaching aids for his students.”
According to Miller, more than 500 of these geometric pieces are included in Stanford University's Buckminster Fuller archive. She also found them in abundance at the Ryan home, hanging from the ceiling like mobiles.
Ryan also put Fuller's theories to work at home, building one of Fuller's signature geodesic domes for a home during the 1960s outside of Eugene.
As with Fuller, learning was a real passion for Ryan, Miller said, and teaching provided him a creative force. Miller believes that most of Ryan's works were painted in class alongside his students, as he attempted to illustrate theories and provoke experimentation.
When Ryan was done teaching, he took his work home and left it. He had had a few showings of his work over the course of his life, but his motivation wasn't material, Miller said, nor was he inclined to seek recognition.
”I think he was born in a time when you were either good or you weren't,” Miller said. ”Marketing wasn't a big deal. They recognized you or they didn't.”
Miller said Ryan's position as an art teacher allowed him to fully develop as an artist, enjoying ample time to paint and freedom from the need to sell his work.
”He had the time to concentrate on art as he taught and he was not expected to show his work,” Miller said. ”I think all his works were to educate himself and to know that he could do it, and to discover things for himself and then pass his discoveries on to his students.
”He was a thoughtful, philosophical man but his art was very personal,” Miller added. ”I don't get a sense that he gushed about nature and art. The expression of who he was came through in his art and his teaching.”
What: An exhibit of artwork by the late Tumalo resident and University of Oregon art professor Charles Bryan Ryan
When: Through July 31
Where: Bend Public Library, 601 NW Wall St., Bend
Cost: Free
Contact: 617-7040
-->
After retiring from his art professorship at the University of Oregon in 1976, Charles Bryan Ryan moved to Tumalo, never to paint again.
Having spent 30 years introducing theory and technique to U of O art students, Ryan was ready to indulge his other passion: the outdoors. He joined the Over the Hill Gang, a local senior ski club, and until his death in 2001 at age 92, Ryan hiked, camped and reveled in the area's natural beauty, according to family friend Sandra Miller.
In 2003, Rhoda Ryan called Miller, owner of Frame Design and Sunbird Gallery in Bend, and asked what she should do with her late husband's artwork. She had sold the family home and was preparing an estate sale in advance of her move to an assisted-living facility.
Miller obliged her friend, and found Ryan's paintings stacked unceremoniously in the couple's garage, left by the late artist to gather dust. Upon reviewing the art, Miller was awestruck.
”All (the paintings) were dusty and dirty, but all these wonderful colors came out,” Miller said. ”My first feeling was 'Oh my God, this is a group of paintings we really need to show people.'”
And so with Rhoda Ryan's permission, Miller began cataloging Ryan's work. What she discovered was a comprehensive collection of modern art that ranged from geometric abstractions to Cezanne-inspired landscapes, amassed from Ryan's long teaching career. Many of the paintings are thickly painted, in the impasto style, rendered with complementary colors to add tonal effects, Miller said.
”You can't just put paint on if you don't know what you are doing. I mean you can, but it won't turn out like this,” said Miller of the exhibit.
After a year was spent cleaning, cataloging and framing the art, often using frames built by Ryan and left in a similar dusty stack, Miller hung the work in The Gallery in the Pinckney Center for the Arts at Central Oregon Community College in October of 2003.
From there, the exhibit traveled to the Coos Art Museum in Coos Bay. M.J. Koreiva, the executive director of the museum, described Ryan as an influential contemporary artist.
”His work is very reflective of mid-1950s and mid-'60s art work,” Koreiva said. ”Contemporary works of the '50s are now looked back upon as holding the test of time.”
The exhibit is now back in Central Oregon, hanging at the Bend Public Library through July (see ”If You Go”). It includes mostly oil paintings, but also pastels, drawings, prints, lithographs and sketches.
”He was definitely a product of the age,” Miller said. ”I also think that he was ahead of his time insofar as he was teaching the art aesthetic of cubism, and elements that came from the later part of the 1800s and early 1900s.”
Ryan was born in 1909 in Fort Jones, Calif., a small Northern California town in the shadow of Mount Shasta. At the U of O, he earned a bachelor's degree in fine arts in 1939, and a master's in fine arts the following year. He was then hired as a teaching assistant in the university's zoology department, according to the exhibit's biography of Ryan, before World War II intervened.
As an avid outdoorsman, Ryan was recruited to join the Army's famed 10th Mountain Division, the ”ski troops.” Among those he served with was Mount Bachelor founder Bill Healy.
When the division was ordered to the Italian front, Lt. Ryan took advantage of his relocation to study art, leading fellow soldiers on tours of the region's art and architectural highlights. Immediately after the war, Ryan stayed overseas to teach art at the University of Florence in Italy.
He returned to Oregon in 1946, taking up an art instructor position with the U of O, and stayed with the university until his retirement.
Through the U of O, Ryan developed a friendship with Buckminster Fuller, the renowned 20th-century architect, scientist and philosopher. It was a relationship that deeply affected both Ryan's work and his life. In the exhibit at the library is a letter from Ryan to Fuller, addressed to ”Bucky.”
”Ryan was a good friend of Fuller's,” Miller said. ”He took on a lot of his ideas and theories, such as how strength is created by certain geometric formations, and (Ryan) built examples of these principles as teaching aids for his students.”
According to Miller, more than 500 of these geometric pieces are included in Stanford University's Buckminster Fuller archive. She also found them in abundance at the Ryan home, hanging from the ceiling like mobiles.
Ryan also put Fuller's theories to work at home, building one of Fuller's signature geodesic domes for a home during the 1960s outside of Eugene.
As with Fuller, learning was a real passion for Ryan, Miller said, and teaching provided him a creative force. Miller believes that most of Ryan's works were painted in class alongside his students, as he attempted to illustrate theories and provoke experimentation.
When Ryan was done teaching, he took his work home and left it. He had had a few showings of his work over the course of his life, but his motivation wasn't material, Miller said, nor was he inclined to seek recognition.
”I think he was born in a time when you were either good or you weren't,” Miller said. ”Marketing wasn't a big deal. They recognized you or they didn't.”
Miller said Ryan's position as an art teacher allowed him to fully develop as an artist, enjoying ample time to paint and freedom from the need to sell his work.
”He had the time to concentrate on art as he taught and he was not expected to show his work,” Miller said. ”I think all his works were to educate himself and to know that he could do it, and to discover things for himself and then pass his discoveries on to his students.
”He was a thoughtful, philosophical man but his art was very personal,” Miller added. ”I don't get a sense that he gushed about nature and art. The expression of who he was came through in his art and his teaching.”


1.28.2015

Dr Paul A Mullan

Dr Paul A Mullan

Dr. Paul A. Mullan, a retired Baltimore pediatrician who had also served in the air Force Medical Corps, died Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice of complications from a stroke.  He was 84.

The son of George Vaughn Mullan, who was supervisor of maintenance for the New York subway system, and Mary Calaghy Mullan, and administrative assistant, Paul Aloysius Mullan was born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn.

He was a graduate of St. Francis deSales School in Geneva, N.Y., and graduated in 1948 from Seton Hall Preparatory School in South Orange, N.J.

After earning a bachelor's degree in 1952 in chemistry, he enrolled at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, and after a year entered the University of Maryland School of Medicine, where he earned a medical degree in 1957.

Dr. Mullan completed a rotating internship in 1958 at the Jersey City Medical Center in New Jersey, as well as a residency in pediatrics in 1959 at what is now Mercy Medical Center, where he was chief resident from 1959 to 1960.

From 1960 until retiring in the late 1990s, Dr. Mullan maintained a private practice at his Osler Drive office in Towson. He also was an attending physician and a member of the pediatric staff at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Mercy Medical Center, Greater Baltimore Medical Center and what is now University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, where he chaired the department of pediatrics from 1969 to 1979.

Dr. Mullan was an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Maryland and the Johns Hopkins schools of medicine.

Dr. Mullan was commissioned a captain in the Air Force Medical Corps and was promoted to colonel. He was commanding officer from 1964 to 1967 of the 22nd Medical Service Squadron at Andrews Air Force Base in Washington. He later was assigned as a staff pediatrician to the 9019th Air Reserve Squadron at the Malcolm Grow Air Force Medical Center at Andrews Air Force Base. He was discharged with the rank of colonel in 1990.

Dr. Mullan and his wife made headlines in 1979 when they adopted a foundling who had been discovered earlier that year in a Towson apartment vestibule.

The child was originally named Joseph Francis Towson, or Joe Towson, by county police, and was cared for by Dr. Mullan, who at the time was living in the 3900 block of N. Charles St. After a two-day hearing to legally adopt the child, the Mullans named him Paul Edward Kennedy Mullan.

Their son, who became a photographer, died of a brain tumor in 2013. He was 34.

Dr. Mullan married Carol Kennedy in 1975. They lived in the Orchards neighborhood of North Baltimore.
Dr. Mullan was a powerboater, world traveler and a "sometimes golfer," said his wife, a retired schoolteacher. "His hobby was the Air Force. He loved the military."

Dr. Mullan was a communicant of the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St., where a Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 11 a.m. Saturday.

He is survived by his wife.

The Baltimore Sun

6.25.2013

Paul Edward Kennedy Mullan

Paul Edward Kennedy Mullan

 

January 1979 - February 27, 2013

Paul Mullan was my friend. 
I miss him terribly.
He lost a decade plus battle with brain cancer... but, let me tell you, he fought hard and never gave up.



Paul and his parents and O'Sea in 2011

What can I share about my friend????

He had an interesting life... from birth to death.

He had a brilliant and quick mind.

He dealt with pain with a grace I didn't know existed.

He was a patriot and a conservative... he loved politics!

He was kind to his friends. He was loyal to his friends.

He was a photographer... a quite good one.

He loved surfing.

He loved Ocean City, Maryland.

He loved being part of the beach patrol there.

He loved his home state of Maryland.

He loved his prep school, Gilman.

He loved his college, Catholic University of America.

He loved his church.

He loved his parents.

He loved his dog, O'Sea.

His life was derailed by cancer, but he kept going as best he could, and better than most do with health.



Paul E.K. Mullan, 34,
photographer who was chronicled as infant found in Towson

As a baby found wrapped in blanket, he was dubbed 'Joe Towson'

  • Paul Mullan
         Paul Mullan (Baltimore Sun )
March 03, 2013|By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun

 
Paul Edward Kennedy Mullan, a photographer who made headlines as a foundling discovered in a Towson apartment vestibule, died of a brain tumor Feb. 27 at his parents' North Baltimore home. He was 34.

The story of his first days filled news columns in January 1979. The Sun reported he was discovered near the vestibule mailboxes of a Towson garden apartment near Towson University. Days old, he was wrapped in a plaid blanket and dressed in a J.C. Penney shirt and a diaper held together with Scotch tape.
Baltimore County police officers took the infant to nearby St. Joseph Medical Center, where he was informally named Joseph Francis Towson, or Joe Towson.

"Joseph is the star attraction of the nursing station in the pediatrics ward ... where the nurses think he is beautiful," a Sun story said.

Months later, the baby was again making news stories. He became the subject of an adoption conflict, part of which was jurisdictional. Dr. Paul A. Mullan, a St. Joseph staff member and a pediatrician who cared for the infant after he was found, and his wife, Carol, a school teacher, had no children of their own and sought to adopt him.

The Mullans then lived in the 3900 block of N. Charles St. in the city, several miles from the Baltimore County line.

Judge John N. Maguire held a two-day hearing and by July 1979, the baby became the couple's legally adopted son.

The baby was diagnosed with a congenital heart ailment that required open-heart surgery later performed by Dr. Bruce Reitz, then of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Mr. Mullan was enrolled at the Gilman School, where he graduated in 1997.

"He brought nothing but joy," said Gilman's headmaster, John E. Schmick, who had been his faculty adviser. "He was always on the sidelines, cheering. He was a real positive member of his class."

Mr. Mullan spent three years in the architecture program at the Catholic University of America, but left after he was diagnosed with a brain tumor and underwent surgeries.

On his website, Mr. Mullan discussed his decision to leave architecture. "My memory was too impacted by my surgeries and other treatments. That brought me back to my photography," he said in his essay.
"I started my photography in the 6th grade. I was the photo editor for both the yearbook and newspaper while attending high school. ... When my junior and senior years came I had to develop Independent Studies in photography," he said in the website. "Spending every summer on the Eastern Shore of Maryland I wanted to capture the sights found from the Chesapeake Bay to the Atlantic Ocean."

He also said that he devoted months to doing fine art photographic essays. "Photographs cannot have smells, tastes, texture, or sounds, but I try to involve all the senses in each photograph by capturing enough to have the viewer associate the image with the actual subject," he wrote. "By working hard to capture the image in perfection, that image can create the feeling of being there by your imagination or a quick day-dream."
He took photos of the stained glass windows in the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, where he was a member and he and his father were ushers. He also photographed the Isle of Wight, Assateague Seashore Park and the Dominican Republic.

He also spent time in Ocean City, Maryland, where he assisted lifeguards patrolling the surfers' beach.

Ginny Milanicz, a family friend from Fallston, said, "He was a happy, energetic person who did a lot of work for other recovering cancer patients."

A funeral Mass will be held at 11 a.m. Monday at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St.
Survivors include his parents.
Baltimore Sun


MULLAN , Paul E. On February 27, 2013, Paul E. Kennedy Mullan , beloved son of Dr. Paul A. and Carol A. (nee Kennedy ) Mullan. Also survived by many friends and family members. Paul will also be missed by his beloved dog O'Sea.
Friends may call at The Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home, 6500 York Road (at Overbrook) on Saturday from 5-7 PM and Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 PM. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at the Cathedral Of Mary Our Queen on Monday at 11 AM. Interment will follow in St. Mary's (Govans) Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions in Paul's name to Hopewell Cancer Support, P.O. Box 755, Brooklandville, MD 21022
Published in Baltimore Sun on March 2, 2013

6.02.2010

Mary Jean Martin


Mary Jean Martin
July 14, 1939 - July 26, 1949
Our Darling

Section 5

D Juanita Martin


D Juanita Martin
October 24, 1920 - March 2, 1975
Wife   Mother

m. Clifford L Martin
father of Mary Jean Martin

Section 5

Clifford L Martin


Clifford L Martin
June 19, 1915 - June 26, 1986
Husband   Father

m. D Juanita Martin
father of Mary Jean Martin

Section 5

Norma Kelsay Finley


Norma Kelsay Finley
1932 - 1951

dau. Jessie W & Wilbur J Finley

Section 5

Wilbur J Kelsay


Wilbur J Kelsay
1906 - 1977

m. Jessie W Kelsay
father of Norma Kelsay Finley

Section 5

Jessie W Kelsay


Jessie W Kelsay
1904 - 1992

m. Wilber J Kelsay
mother of Norma Kelsay Finley

Section 5

6.01.2010

Lois M 'Ferg' Ferguson Cady


Lois M 'Ferg' Ferguson Cady
October 16, 1923 - Bend, Oregon
October 21, 2004 - Bend, Oregon
Beloved Mother

dau. Grace & Burton Ferguson
m. Ivan Cady - May 29, 1945, Oakland California

buried next to parents

Section 5

Burton E Ferguson


Burton E Ferguson
1899 - 1959
Jesus Saves

m. Grace E Ferguson
father of Lois M Ferguson Cady

Section 5

Grace E Ferguson


Grace E Ferguson
1903 - 1995
Jesus Saves

m. Burton E Ferguson
mother of Lois M Ferguson Cady

Section 5

Charles L Griffith


Charles L Griffith
1891 - 1958
BPOE

m. Clare M Griffith

buried next to:
Kristen Wanker
Kristofer Erik Carlson

Section 5

Clare M Griffith


Clare M Griffith
1894 - 1985

m. Charles L Griffith

buried next to:
Kristen Wanker
Kristofer Erik Carlson

Section 5

Kristofer Erik Carlson


Kristofer Erik Carlson
October 6, 1985
In God's Care

buried next to:
Kristen Wanker
Clare & Charles Griffith
 
Section 5

Kristen Wanker


Kristen Wanker
July 10, 1988
In God's Care
Our Twin Baby Girl

buried next to:
Kristofer Erik Carlson 
Clare & Charles Griffith

Section 5

Thomas G Russell


Thomas G Russell
December 22, 1890 - June 5, 1957
IDAHO
CPL   BTRY C 37 FLD ARTY
WORLD WAR I

Section 5

Carroll E Sanborn


Carroll E Sanborn
1890 - 1963

m. Agnes E P Sanborn

Section 5

Agnes E P Sanborn


Agnes E P Sanborn
1890 - 1988

m. Carroll E Sanborn

Section 5

Robert Earl Sanborn


Robert Earl Sanborn
March 22, 1928 - March 27, 1957
OREGON
A02   US NAVY
WORLD WAR II - KOREA

Section 5

Glenn T Osborn


Glenn T Osborn
September 17, 1897 - September 5, 1988
PVT   US ARMY
WORLD WAR I

Section 5

Henry 'Hank' McFadden


Henry (Hank) McFadden
1933 - 1989

Section 5

Jack R Douglas


Jack R Douglas
April 8, 1927 - April 25, 1985
PFC   US MARINE CORPS
WORLD WAR II

Section 5

Arthur C Goolsby


Arthur C Goolsby
1913 - 1959
Husband

m. Norma Goolsby

Section 5